Tuesday, December 18, 2007

Islam, Not Just Another Religion

I would like to know my fellow bloggers' opinions about a couple of articles. The first I found over at American Thinker.
Do you feel it is -- Right on the mark? Exaggerated? Inflammatory?

Do you have -- Something to add? A helpful related link to share? A personal story related to this?

If you are not pressed for time read the article, Islam, Not Just Another Religion, in its entirety. Here are excerpts:

"Six years after 9/11, most Americans remain ignorant about the history, nature and intent of Islamic jihad. They know little about the worldwide presence of Islamist groups, the hateful rhetoric directed toward non-Muslims spewing from mosques and madrassas, the use of the Internet by Muslim radicals to spread their propaganda and connect with each other, the extent of weapons arsenals and nuclear proliferation, and the geopolitical interconnections between countries in the Middle East, Europe, Pakistan, Afghanistan, South America, North Korea, Southeast Asia and Africa.

The Bush Administration and the media have focused on Islam as a "religion of peace" and have done little to educate the public about the presence of Islamist groups on American soil, the level of their infiltration and their ultimate objectives.


Viewing Islamic fundamentalism as just another faith is to play into the hands of those who would destroy us.

Many Westerners, who worship at the altar of multiculturalism and erroneously believe that Islam is just another faith, fail to understand the inherent cultural and political dangers of a religion that is a consummate ideology for the faithful. Unwitting Westerners write off barbaric punishments as mere cultural differences.


The popular, pluralistic bumper sticker "Coexist "espouses a philosophy of religious harmony, mutual acceptance and brotherhood across all faiths and nations. Yet, in Islam, the word of Allah, as represented in the Koran, reigns supreme and overrides any state-imposed laws. The Koran dictates three options for non-believers: conversion, subjugation or death. "


The second article is from yesterday. It was carried by Zenit: "Benedict XVI Calls for Human Ecology." Here are exerpts from that article (read full article by clicking title hyperlink):

The Holy Father recognized Kuwait's acknowledgment of the "importance of interreligious and intercultural dialogue for the promotion of peace."

"Such dialogue," he wrote, "and I think here with satisfaction of the increasing contacts between Muslims and Christians -- is essential for overcoming misunderstandings and forging solid relations marked by mutual respect and cooperation in the pursuit of the common good of the whole human family. Children, in particular, need to be educated in the authentic values underlying their own culture and in a spirit of openness to other cultures, respect for others and commitment to peace.

"In a world where intolerance, violence and oppression are all too often proposed as the solution to disagreements and conflict, there is urgent need of a 'human ecology,' capable of extirpating these evils and sowing those virtues which will foster the growth of a truly humane culture of honesty, solidarity and concord."

Benedict XVI lauded the religious freedom in Kuwait that allows Catholics living and working there to "freely worship in their own churches."

"This fundamental right, grounded in the inviolable dignity of the person, is fittingly considered the cornerstone of the whole edifice of human rights," he added [...] " the formation of young Christian students in their faith, [Catholic] schools will help to strengthen the fabric of society by preparing their students to cooperate in building a future of solidarity and hope for coming generations."

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

The first article is heavy handed -- it tells truths but in a way that feels inflammatory. I am inclined to strongly follow the Holy Father's advise in telling us of the "need to be educated in the authentic values underlying (each person's) own culture and in a spirit of openness to other cultures, respect for others and commitment to peace."
If finding the common ground of "commitment to peace" is not possible then we do need to be wary AND we need to have allies. Islamic fundamentalism is something we must be very careful to watch.

Daniel said...

I think the Islamic jihad are dangerous. We would be fools to think we could find any common values when it comes to peacefully co-existing with them. They want others to convert or be punished . . . by them.

Pope Benedict says, "In a world where intolerance, violence and oppression are all too often proposed as the solution to disagreements and conflict, there is urgent need of a 'human ecology,' capable of extirpating these evils and sowing those virtues which will foster the growth of a truly humane culture of honesty, solidarity and concord."

The Islamic jihad epitomize intolerance, violence and oppression. We must work hard to (as The Holy Father says) sow those virtues to foster the growth of a truly humane culture.

Joyce Paul said...

I wish I knew the Islam faith more so I could understand the difference between the fundamentalists and those we might have some values in commom with.

Izzy said...

**sigh** All the more reason to raise our children strong in their Catholic faith. Terrorist activities (I believe) will happen more and more even here - in North America.
How to deal with it? Follow the social doctrines of our faith. There is no other way.
Anger and fear can make people do awful things. Pray and stay close to our faith.

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