Sunday, January 10, 2016

I Shall Not Want

 I Shall Not Want  by Audrey Assad  is based on the Litany of Humility  and on Psalm 23.  This song models the humility Christ gave us in Philippians 2:5-8:
"Have this mind among yourselves, which is yours in Christ Jesus, who, though he was in the form of God, did not count equality with God a thing to be grasped, but emptied himself, by taking the form of a servant, being born in the likeness of men. And being found in human form, he humbled himself by becoming obedient to the point of death, even death on a cross."
The Litany of Humility is a prayer from the perspective of one who recognizes our naturally wicked disposition, but also recognizes the grace given through Jesus who reshapes and reforms our hearts into ones that beat in rhythm with his - hearts that look like the heart of Jesus shown in Philippians 2:5-8.

Audrey Assad’s song I Shall Not Want  blends the words of this prayer with an echo of Psalms 23 and 34 as the refrain: “When I taste your goodness, I shall not want.”

Monday, December 14, 2015

Mary Did You Know FAQ (by Mark Shea)

Thank you . What a great article!


Mary Did You Know?
Mary, did you know that your Baby Boy would one day walk on water?
A: No. Mary is not omniscient and could not foresee every particular act of her Son. See the story of the Finding in the Temple in Luke 2:41-51.
Mary, did you know that your Baby Boy would save our sons and daughters?
A: Yes. “And behold, you will conceive in your womb and bear a son, and you shall call his name Jesus” (Lk 1:31). “Y’shua” means “the Lord is salvation”. Mary knew the meaning of that Name. That’s why she said, “My spirit exults in God my *Savior*.” It’s also why she spoke with complete awareness that her Son was the fulfilment of the promise of salvation to Abraham, a promise that encompasses the whole world since Abraham was told that through him, all the nations of the earth would be blessed. So she says,
“He has helped his servant Israel,
in remembrance of his mercy,
as he spoke to our fathers,
to Abraham and to his posterity for ever.” (Lk 1:54–55).
Did you know that your Baby Boy has come to make you new? This Child that you delivered will soon deliver you.
A: Yes. In fact, she knew that her Son had *already* delivered her, because she, the most saved person in the world, was immaculately conceived by his grace and preserved from all sin both original and actual. That’s why the angel greeted her with “Kaire, Kecharitomene” or “Hail, Full-of-Grace” (Luke 1:28) and why she thanks God her Savior.
Mary, did you know that your Baby Boy will give sight to a blind man?
A: No. Mary is not omniscient and could not foresee every particular act of her Son. See the story of the Finding in the Temple in Luke 2:41-51.
Mary, did you know that your Baby Boy will calm the storm with His hand?
A: No. Mary is not omniscient and could not foresee every particular act of her Son. See the story of the Finding in the Temple in Luke 2:41-51.
Did you know that your Baby Boy has walked where angels trod?
When you kiss your little Baby you kissed the face of God?
A: Yes. In fact, an angel who walked where angels trod, named Gabriel, specifically informed her that “He will be great, and will be called the Son of the Most High (Luke 1:32)
And when she asked for clarification of this astounding claim, the angel told her:
“The Holy Spirit will come upon you,
and the power of the Most High will overshadow you;
therefore the child to be born will be called holy,
the Son of God.”(cf. Lk 1:32–35).
Mary, did you know that your Baby Boy is Lord of all creation?
A: Yes. This goes with being “Son of the Most High” and conceived by the Holy Spirit. Part of the job description, particularly since Mary (who, along with Joseph, taught Jesus his Bible) knew the Book of Daniel backwards and forwards and knew this passage:
and behold, with the clouds of heaven
there came one like a son of man,
and he came to the Ancient of Days
and was presented before him.
And to him was given dominion
and glory and kingdom,
that all peoples, nations, and languages
should serve him;
his dominion is an everlasting dominion,
which shall not pass away,
and his kingdom one
that shall not be destroyed.(Da 7:13–14).
She heard Jesus refer to himself as the Son of Man many times. She knew what he meant by that.
Mary, did you know that your Baby Boy would one day rule the nations?
A: Yes. The Angel Gabriel was really quite plain about all that:
“and the Lord God will give to him the throne of his father David,
and he will reign over the house of Jacob for ever;
and of his kingdom there will be no end.” (Luke 1:32)
Did you know that your Baby Boy is heaven’s perfect Lamb?
The sleeping Child you’re holding is the Great, I Am.
A: In summary, yes.  Mary did know that.  And Christians knew she knew that for roughly the first 17 centuries of the Church until a small but influential minority of Protestants, mostly in the English-speaking world came to dominate Christian discourse. The result was multiple generations of Evangelicals so filled with fear and loathing of Mary that they came to believe that Mary had no idea who Jesus was and lived her life in either stupid incomprehension of, or hostility to, the Son of God.  So we get tales that constantly cast her as either an unbelieving blasphemer (in Evangelical exegeses of Mark 3).  Or conversely, we get condemnation of Mary for believing Jesus too much and trying to shove him on to the public stage (in Evangelical exegeses of the Wedding at Cana).
So the myth has grown up that Mary had no idea who Jesus was and that Jesus was typically hostile to her.  What this illustrates is that the same principle by which the Latest Real Jesus always reflects our face back to us also applies to Evangelical takes on Mary.  What we discover in the strange Mommie Dearest vision of Mary in older Evangelical circles is nothing about Mary, but plenty about the peculiar fears Evangelical culture has of connecting anything feminine with Christian piety.
Given that background, I regard songs like “Mary Did You Know” as a step forward for Evangelical culture, but a step backward for Catholic culture.  I think it’s a song that has no place in the liturgy since it is a marinated in a theology that is, at best, describable as “Recovering Evangelical”.  It is a song written by and for a younger generation of Evangelicals who see Mary as a sort of “forbidden fruit”: someone their parents did not talk about and weirdly treated as taboo.  Someone they are becoming curious about.  That’s good.  I encourage that curiosity because it will, with God’s help, lead to a recovery of the fully Marian piety that was handed down by the apostles to Holy Church.  But Catholics should not sacrifice that fulness by embracing Evangelical and post-Evangelical notions that Mary was ignorant of and hostile toward her Son.  She wasn’t.  She was his greatest disciple and knew herself to be the Mother of the Son of God from the start.  The sooner we see that, the sooner we grasp how to be disciples ourselves.

This is a perfect addition to my Catholic Notebook. It is most definitely  keeper.

Saturday, December 5, 2015

The Grand Punch of St. Nicholas

During the First Ecumenical Council of Nicea (AD 325) there was a big argument

over the divinity of Christ. Arius — a heretic — was of the idea that Christ was not divine, but rather a mere creature. The Council gave him leave to speak, to defend his claims, and he did, yammering on — I have no doubt — in a relentless flood of sophistry.

Jolly Old St. Nicholas — oh yes, he was a bishop — wasn’t having any of it. He tried to listen patiently, he really did, but Arius’ speech was just so wrong, that he was compelled to get up in the midst of it and, yep, punch him in the face.


BOOM! YOU JUST GOT KRIS-KRINGLED SON!


I hold that this is the image of Santa Claus we need to reclaim. Because when you think about it, this was the original campaign to Put the Christ Back in Christmas. Arius would have made the nativity a non-event. He, majestically prefiguring the various sects of Happy-Holiday-ers, Winter Solstice-ers, and it’s-actually-a-pagan-holiday-ers (that’s the point, you muppets!) denied that Christmas need be a celebration of substance at all. So when the modern world promotes the consumerist image of Santa Claus over the image of Christ, it is not so much the wrath of Christ they should fear as it is the wrath of Santa Claus. He may very well climb down the chimney and wup you.

Christmas is about this singular, terrible reality: That the Word became flesh and dwelt among us. In the spirit of St. Nick; accept no substitute.

Perhaps our Christmas carols need to be rewritten in light of the Grand Punch of St. Nicholas. It wouldn’t be too hard, we could sing: 
~~> Jolly Old St. Nicholas/Lend your fist this way . . . .
~~> I saw Dawkins rocked by Santa Claus/flying from the podium last niiighht . . . . .
and of course, 
~~> He sees when you’re dissenting/he knows when you’ve blasphemed/he knows your schismatic doctrines/and so he’s gonna punch your face/Oh, you better not doubt/You better not divide/You better not bring scandal to the Holy Roman Catholic Church/I’m telling you why/Saaaanta Claus is smacking you down . . . .
etc. etc. etc.

So thank you St. Nicholas, for your inspired punch. Oh, I almost forgot the end of the story. I’ll let Taylor Marshall, who writes over at Cantebury Tales tell it:
Now if that were the end of the story, we probably wouldn’t know about Saint Nicholas, and our children wouldn’t be asking him for presents. However, after Nicholas was deposed, the Lord Jesus Christ and the Blessed Virgin Mary visited Nicholas who was being held in a prison cell for his fist-fight with the heretic. 
Our Lord Jesus Christ asked Saint Nicholas, “Why are you here?” Nicholas responded, “Because I love you, my Lord and my God.”
Christ then presented Nicholas with his copy of the Gospels. Next, the Blessed Virgin vested Nicholas with his episcopal pallium, thus restoring him to his rank as a bishop.
 When the Emperor Constantine heard of this miracle, he immediately ordered that Nicholas be reinstated as a bishop in good standing for the Council of Nicea. Today we recite the Nicene Creed every Sunday so we know how the controversy played out. The bishops at Nicea sided with Saint Nicholas and Saint Athanasius and they condemned Arius as a heretic.

To this very day, we still recite in the Creed that Christ is “God from God, Light from Light, True God from True God, begotten not made, consubstantial with the Father.”


Sunday, November 22, 2015

Thanksgiving 1, 2, 3, Squanto, Eucharista, Belloc

Most history books these days tell us that the first Thanksgiving was celebrated by the pilgrims in 1621. Not true. Perhaps these 3 facts will clear up this culturally accepted historical misconception which has reached the proportions of "myth."  
Have you ever heard the old adage, "real power belongs to those who write the history books?"  Unfortunately there is veracity in that statement, but we shouldn't let us deter us from seeking the truth.
But the truth is out there. Let's hang onto it. Here are the facts.


1st --> The First American Thanksgiving was celebrated on September 8, 1565 in St. Augustine, Florida. September 8 is the Feast of the birth of the Blessed Virgin. The Native Americans and Spanish settlers held a feast and the Holy Mass was offered. This was 56 years before the Puritan pilgrims of Massachusetts. 

2nd --> The next Thanksgiving celebration occurred on American soil on April 30, 1598 in Texas when Don Juan de Onate declared a day of Thanksgiving to be commemorated by the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass. Think about it . . . this was 23 years before the Pilgrims set sail from England on the Mayflower.
Don Juan de Oñate & the Mansos.
Painting by Jose Cisneros, courtesy of the University of Texas at El Paso 
3rd --> On the third Thanksgiving in 1621, the Pilgrims allegedly celebrated a happy meal with Native Americans and the rest is the history with which we are familiar.
Did you know that the Puritan pilgrims were violently anti-Catholic? The Puritans left England because they thought that the Church of England was too Catholic. These folks were strict Calvinists. The pilgrims also opposed celebrating Christmas, dancing, musical instruments in church, and even hymns. They considered these things too papistical.  Ironically, the Pilgrims shared the same problems that Catholics had in England. The Catholics who lived in Nottinghamshire where the Pilgrims originated, were persecuted mercilessly.


So while that 3rd Thanksgiving may celebrate the Calvinist Separatists who fled England,
there is more to the story. Catholics should remember that the same unjust laws that granted the crown of martyrdom to Thomas More, John Fisher, Edmund Campion, et al., are the same injustices that led the Pilgrims to Plymouth. Hmmmm, why don't the history books mention this? I do believe that the Protestant-shaded history textbooks is the fodder for a future post.

Here is my favorite favorite piece of Thanksgiving trivia.Remember Squanto, the beloved hero of Thanksgiving?  Squanto (also known as: Tisquantum) was the Native American man who mediated between the Puritan Pilgrims and the Native Americans. Squanto's history is amazing. He had actually been enslaved by the English but then freed by Spanish Franciscans. Squanto thus received baptism and became a Catholic. So it was a baptised Catholic Native American who orchestrated what has become known as the "first Thanksgiving."

Most importantly, let us remember that Thanksgiving" in Greek is Eucharista. Thus, the Body and Blood of Christ is the true "Thanksgiving Meal."

This Thanksgiving be sure to raise your wine glass and recite the wonderful limerick of Hilaire Belloc.
"Wherever the Catholic sun doth shine,
There's always laughter and good red wine.
At least I've always found it so.
Benedicamus Domino!"


Sources:
https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-difference-between-Puritans-and-Pilgrims
Taylor Marshall
http://www.texasbeyondhistory.net/paso/history.html

Thursday, November 12, 2015

The Highest Barbarism on Earth



The Islamic terror group ISIS is leaving a trail of destruction across large parts of Syria and Iraq with a specific target in their crosshairs.

Hundreds of thousands of Christians have been displaced from their homes and countless others have been murdered or enslaved by the jihadist army, with no end in sight.

Sister Hatune Dogan has been on the ground and witnessed the devastation of these ancient Christian communities. She's listened to survivors tell how Christians and Yazidi women are being sold into sex slavery.

"They choose the most beautiful one, even if they have a small child, and they sell these women, these ladies to each other. They don't sell to another religion -- only Sunni Muslim," Dogan said.
"There have been 12,000 kidnapped at the hands of ISIS - Yazidi alone. What is going on there, what I was hearing, is the highest barbarism on earth in the history until today," she added.

Her foundation helps the poor and persecuted in 35 countries, providing them with food, clothing, medicine and shelter.
She travels constantly with a special focus in the Muslim world.
"I'm not coming here for a holiday. I'm coming here to bring a voice to the voiceless so that the world can hear their voice. They don't have a voice. I am the channel for them. That is my mission," Dogan declared.

Sister Dogan is no stranger to Islamic persecution. As a young girl, threats from local Muslims forced her family to leave their home in Turkey.
They relocated to Germany, where she operates her foundation and sounds the alarm about the gathering Islamic storm.

"The mission of (Abu Bakr) Baghdadi, of ISIS, is to convert the world completely to the Islamic religion and bring them to Dar Al Salaam, as they call it. And Islam is not peace, please. Whoever says ISIS has no connection to Islam or something like this is, he's a liar. ISIS is Islam; Islam is ISIS," Dogan explained.

She's disappointed by what she calls a weak reaction from the West.

Saturday, October 31, 2015

List: Free Traditional Catholic Books

There is a  fantastic treasure trove of good, traditional Catholic books available for free or near-free. Below are links to valuable and timeless Catholic texts (including those written by great saints and Fathers and Doctors of the Church) that you can read and download for free. Take advantage of this – they have changed my life and will change yours, too. Tolle et lege!

Catholic Life, Path to Holiness 
The Spiritual Combat (Fr. Lorenzo Scupoli) – pdf, text, kindle format
The Practice of Perfection and Christian Virtues (Fr. Alphonsus Rodriguez) – Vol I (doc format)  and Vol II (doc format)
On Union with God (St. Albert the Great) – pdf, text, kindle format
Prayer, the Key of Salvation (Fr. M. Mueller) – pdf, text, kindle format
The Ways of Mental Prayer (Dom V. Lehodey) – pdf, text, kindle format
Directorium Asceticum: Guide to the Spiritual Life (Fr. G. B. Scaramelli) – vol. Ivol. IIvol. IIIvol. IV
Spiritual Theology (Fr. Jordan Aumann) – pdf, text, kindle format
The Mystical Evolution (Fr. J. G. Arintero) – pdf: volume Ivolume II
A Manual of Mystical Theology (Fr. A. Devine) – pdf, text, kindle format
Meditations on the Mysteries of Our Holy Faith (Fr. Luis de la Puente) – vol. Ivol. IIvol. III,vol. IVvol. Vvol. VI
The Following of Christ (Fr. J. Tauler) – pdf, text, kindle format; or read online and pdf here
The Friendship of Christ (Mons. R. H. Benson) – audiobook; or read online here

Our Lord, Our Lady 
The Mystical City of God (vol 1-4) (Ven. Maria de Jesus de Agreda) – pdf, audio; or here in pdf; or read online here
Life of Our Lord Jesus Christ (Bl. Anne Catherine Emmerich)- vol. Ivol. IIvol. IIIvol. IV
The Gospel as Revealed to Me (Maria Valtorta) – pdf, text, kindle format: 5 volumes
The Seven Dolours of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Fr. Sebastian of the Blessed Sacrament) – pdf, kindle
The Divine Eucharist (St. Peter Julian Eymard) – pdf
History of the Passion (Fr. Arthur Devine) – pdf, text, kindle format
The Watches of the Sacred Passion (Fr. P. Gallwey) – pdf, text, kindle format: volume I,volume II
The Mystery of Jesus (Fr. S. Louismet) – pdf, text, kindle format
The Interior of Jesus and Mary (Fr. J. N. Grou) – pdf, text, kindle: volume Ivolume II

Lives of Saints
The Life of St. Pius V (Fr. T. A. Dyson) – pdf, text, kindle format
Pope St. Pius X (F.A. Forbes) – pdf, text; or kindle format and pdf here; or audiobook here
Life of Pius X (Msg. E. Schmitz) – pdf, text, kindle format
The Cure of Ars (Kathleen O’Meara)– pdf, text, kindle format
Biography of St. Gemma Galgani (Fr. Amedeo) – pdf, text, kindle format
The Diary of St. Gemma Galgani – pdf, text, kindle format
Autobiography of St. Gemma Galgani – pdf, text, kindle format; audiobook here (in 6 parts)
St. Padre Pio and the Miracle of Stigmata – In His Own Words (part 1part 2part 3,) – pdf
The Life of St. Charles Borromeo (G.P. Giussano) – (Vol I, II)-  pdf, text, kindle format
Saint Charles Borromeo: A Sketch of the Reforming Cardinal (L. Stacpoole-Kenny, St. Pius X) – audio version
Life of St. Augustine (St. Possidius) – audiobook; or read online here
Saint Vincent Ferrer (Stanislaus Hogan) – pdf, text, kindle format
St. Bernardine of Siena (P. Thureau-Dangin) – pdf, text, kindle format
Pio X, un Papa Veneto (part I – pdfpart II – pdfpart III – pdf) … illustrated book about St. Pius X (in Italian language, but even if you don’t read Italian, it’s worth looking at the 100+ historic photographs)
The Life of Saint Teresa (M. Trench) – pdf, text, kindle format
The Life of St. John of the Cross (D. Lewis) – pdf, text, kindle format
The Life of Bl. Paul of the Cross (St. Vincent Strambi) – volume Ivolume IIvolume III
The Life of St. Veronica Giuliani (F.M. Salvatori) – read online; or pdf, text here
The Life of St. Francis de Sales (P. G. Gallizia) – volume Ivolume II
The Life of Anthony (St. Athanasius) – audiobook (life of St. Anthony the Abbot)
Saint Benedict (F. A. Forbes) – pdf, text, kindle format
Life and Works of St. Bernard, Abbot of Clairvaux – (pdf, text) volume Ivolume II
Maid of France: The Story of Joan of Arc (Andrew Lang) – audiobook; or pdf and kindle format here
Blessed Joan of Arc (E. A. Ford) – pdf, text, kindle format
The Fathers of the Desert (I. Hahn-Hahn) – pdf, text, kindle format: volume Ivolume II
The Sayings of the Desert Fathers – pdf, text, kindle format
St. Joseph of Cupertino (Angelo Pastrovicchi) – pdf, text, kindle format
Life of St. Dominic (Fr. H. D. Lacordaire) – pdf, text, kindle format
Saint Dominic (Jean Guiraud) – pdf, text, kindle format
Saint Bonaventure (Fr. L. Costelloe) – pdf, text, kindle format
History of the Life and Institute of St. Ignatius de Loyola (Fr. D. Bartoli) – volume Ivolume II
Saint Ignatius Loyola (F. Thompson) – pdf, text, kindle format
Albert the Great (J. Sighart) – pdf, text, kindle format
Life of St. Vincent de Paul (F. A. Forbes) – audiobook; or pdf, text, kindle format here
The Life of St. Francis Borgia (A. M. Clarke) – pdf, text, kindle format
Bernadette (Henri Lasserre) – pdf, text, kindle format
St. Gertrude the Great (Fr. G. Dolan) – pdf, text, kindle format
Life of St. Rita of Cascia (Fr. R. Connolly) – pdf, text, kindle format
The Life of Saint Monica (F. A. Forbes) – audiobook; or pdf, text and kindle format here
Life of St. Monica (Abbe Bougaud) – pdf, text, kindle format
St. Lydwine of Schiedam (Thomas a Kempis) – pdf, text, kindle format
The Life of St. Mary Magdalen (D. Cavalca) – pdf, text, kindle format
The Life and Legend of St. Clare (F. Dupuis) – pdf, text, kindle format
The Life of Saint Clare (Fr. Thomas of Celano) – pdf, text, kindle format
Life of St. Cecilia, Virgin and Martyr (Dom Prosper Gueranger) – pdf, text, kindle format; or audiobook here
Life of St. Angela Merici (Fr. F. J. Parenty) – pdf, text, kindle format
Life of Sister Mary of St. Peter, Carmelite of Tours (autobiography) – pdf, text, kindle
Life of St. Aloysius Gonzaga (Fr. F. Goldie) – pdf, text, kindle format
The Life and Letters of St. Francis Xavier (H. J. Coleridge) – volume Ivolume II
A Life of St. Francis Xavier (M. T. Kelly) – pdf, text, kindle format
The Lepers of Molokai (Ch. W. Stoddard) – audiobook (story of St. Damien of Molokai); or pdf, kindle here
Life of St. John Neumann (Fr. J. A. Berger) – pdf, text, kindle format
Pius IX and His Time (Fr. A. McDonell Dawson) – pdf, text, kindle format
The Life of St. George (E. Clapton) – pdf, text, kindle format
Life of St. Cuthbert (Fr. E. Consitt) – pdf, text, kindle format
Confession (Autobiography of St. Patrick) – audiobook; pdf and text version here
Life of St. Alnselm (Eadmer) – pdf [latin/english]
History of Saint Norbert (Fr. C. J. Kirkfleet) – pdf, text, kindle format
St. Jude Thaddeus (Fr. L. C. Gainor) – pdf, text, kindle format
St. Polycarp, Bishop of Smyrna (J. Blomfield) – pdf, text, kindle format
St. Justin the Martyr (Fr. C. C. Martindale) – pdf, text, kindle format
The Acts of the Early Martyrs (Fr. J. A. M. Fastre) -pdf:  volume Ivolume IIvolume III,volume IVvolume V
Saints for Sinners (Fr. A. Goodier) – pdf, text, kindle format

Writings and Sermons of the Saints
[Books listed above in the sections “Catholic life” and “Our Lord, Our Lady” are not duplicated here, to avoid multiple listings of the same works.]
Soliloquies (St. Augustine) – pdf; or pdf, text, kindle format here
The Holy Eucharist (St. Alphonsus de Liguori) – pdf, text, kindle format
The Holy Mass (St. Alphonsus de Liguori) – pdf, text, kindle format
Maxims and Counsels of St. Francis de Sales – pdf, text, kindle format
The Spirit of St. Teresa (from writings of St. Teresa of Avila) – pdf, text, kindle format
The Secret of Mary (St. Louis de Montfort) – pdf, text, kindle format
Against Heresies (St. Irenaeus) – pdf, text, kindle format; or audiobook here
Divine Consolation (Bl. Angela of Foligno) – pdf, text; or audio book here
Commentary on the Seven Penitential Psalms (St. John Fisher) – volume Ivolume II
Contra Errores Graecorum (St. Thomas Aquinas) – read online [latin/english]
Works of St. Thomas Aquinas – read online [latin/english] (largest collection of his works translated to english);  [All of St. Thomas’ works in latin are here.]
Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine (Bl. John Henry Newman) – audio: part 1,part 2
St. Ambrose: Selected Works and Letters – pdf, text, kindle format
Select Letters of St. Jerome – pdf, text, kindle format
The Moral Concordances of St. Anthony of Padua – pdf, text, kindle format
Letters of St. Alphonsus de Liguori – part 1part 2part 3part 4
Saint Bernardine of Siena: Sermons – pdf, text, kindle format

Our Faith
The Faith of Our Fathers (Cardinal Gibbons) – pdf, text version; or audio book here
The Beauty and Truth of the Catholic Church (Fr. H. von Hurter, E. Jones) – vol. Ivol. IIvol. IIIvol. IVvol. V
The Truths of the Catholic Religion Proved from Scripture Alone – pdf, text, kindle: volume Ivolume II
Catholic Belief (Fr. J. Faa di Bruno) – pdf, text, kindle format
The Teaching of the Catholic Church (Fr. G. D. Smith) – (vol. II) pdf, text, kindle format
A Manual of Apologetics (F. J. Koch) – pdf, text, kindle format
Grace (Fr. Reginald Garrigou-Lagrange) – read online; or pdf here
Grace and the Sacraments (Fr. Michael Mueller) – pdf, text, kindle format
Which Is the True Church? (C. F. B. Allnatt) – pdf, text, kindle format
A Doctrinal Catechism (Rev. Stephen Keenan) – pdf  (addressed to Protestants, demonstrating the truths of the Faith)
Radio Replies in Defence of Religion – read online (great Catholic answers for Protestants)
Which Bible Should You Read (Thomas A. Nelson) – pdf (download starts instantly)
The Commandments Explained (Fr. Arthur Devine) – pdf, text, kindle format
The Creed Explained (Fr. Arthur Devine) – pdf, text, kindle format
The Holy Mass (St. Alphonsus de Liguori) – pdf, text, kindle format
The Holy Eucharist (St. Alphonsus de Liguori) – pdf, text, kindle format
The Future Life (Fr. J. C. Sasia) – pdf, text, kindle format
The Last Things (Abbe A. Michel)  (death, judgement, heaven, hell) – read online
The Four Last Things (Fr. Martin von Cochem) – read online; or pdf, kindle format here
Hell (Fr. F. X. Schouppe) – read online
The Love of Jesus to Penitents (Card. Manning) – audiobook (on confession)
Thoughts on Great Mysteries (Fr. F. G. Faber) – pdf, text, kindle format
The Divinity of Christ (Fr. J. Rickaby) – pdf, text, kindle format
The Evidence for the Papacy (Colin Lindsay) – pdf, text, kindle format
A Treatise on the Church (Fr. H. Klee) – pdf, text, kindle format
The Church (A. G. Sertillanges) – pdf, text, kindle format

Problems with the Modern(ist) Church
An Open Letter to Confused Catholics (Abp. Marcel Lefebvre) – read online; or pdf (compressed/zip) here
Liberalism Is a Sin (Don Felix Sarda y Salvany) – read online
The Suicide of Altering the Faith in the Liturgy (Fr. Paul Kramer) – book 1 and book 2

Miracles, Prodigies, Prophecies
The Shroud of Christ (P. Vignon) – pdf, text, kindle format
Our Lady of Good Success (Apparitions and Prophecies) – pdf
Our Lady of Good Success – read online
On Miracles, volume I and volume II (Bp. George Hay) – pdf
The Question of Miracles (Fr. G. H. Joyce) – pdf, text, kindle format

Miscellaneous 
Liberalism Is a Sin (Fr. Felix Sarda y Salvany) – read online; or audiobook here
Christian Patience (Abp. W. B. Ullathorne) – pdf, text, kindle format
On Patience (Tertullian) – audiobook
The Sign of the Cross (Mons. Jean-Joseph Gaume) – pdf, text, kindle format; or audiobookhere
The World´s First Love (Abp. Fulton Sheen) – pdf, text, kindle format
The Divine Verdict (Abp. Fulton Sheen) – pdf, text, kindle format
Masters of the Spiritual Life (F. W. Drake) – pdf, text, kindle format
The Plot Against the Church (Maurice Pinay) – pdf, text, kindle format
The Prophets and Our Times (Fr. G. Culleton) – pdf, text, kindle format
The Reign of Antichrist (Fr. G. Culleton) – pdf, text, kindle format
The Protocols of the Elders of Zion – pdf, text, kindle format
Will Christ Ever Come Back? (Fr. L. Castellani) – audiobook; or pdf and kindle format here
The Finding of the Cross (Louis de Combes) – pdf, text, kindle format
Origen on Prayer – pdf, text; or audiobook here
Considerations on Eternity (Fr. J. Drexelius) – pdf, text, kindle format
The Cardinal Virtues (Fr. Joseph Rickaby) – pdf, text, kindle format
Our Christian Heritage (Cardinal Gibbons) – pdf, text, kindle format
Selected Works of Fr. Garrigou-Lagrange – pdf, text, kindle format
Compendium of Church History [for use in Catholic schools] – pdf, text, kindle format
A Manual of Church History (F. X. Funk) – pdf, text, kindle format: volume Ivolume II
Studies in Church History (Fr. R. Parsons) – vol. Ivol. IIvol. IIIvol. IVvol. Vvol. VI
Manual of Patrology (Fr. Bernard Schmid) – pdf, text, kindle format
A Handbook of Patrology (Fr. J. Tixeront) – pdf, text, kindle format
A Manual of the History of Dogmas (Fr. Bernard J. Otten) – pdf, text, kindle: volume I,volume II
The Formation of Christendom (T. W. Allies) – vol. Ivol. IIvol. IIIvol. IVvol. Vvol. VIvol. VIIvol. VIII
Mores Catholici, or, Ages of Faith (K. H. Digby) – volume Ivolume IIvolume IIIvolume IV
The Genius of Christianity (Chateaubriand) – pdf, text, kindle format
Pope Boniface VIII and His Times (L. Tosti) – pdf, text, kindle format
Ten Lectures on the Martyrs (Paul Allard) – pdf, text, kindle format
The Great Thousand Years (R. A. Cram) – pdf, text, kindle format
Galileo and His Condemnation (Fr. E. R. Hull) – pdf, text, kindle format
The Grounds of Faith (Cardinal Manning) – pdf, text, kindle format
Why I Became a Catholic (Cardinal Manning) – pdf, text, kindle format
Scholasticism (Fr. J. Rickaby) – pdf, text, kindle format
A Manual of Modern Scholastic Philosophy (Cardinal Mercier) – pdf, text, kindle: volume I,volume II
Indulgences (Cardinal Lepicier) – pdf, text, kindle format
The Modernist (Fr. J. Rickaby) – pdf, text, kindle format
Modernism and Modern Thought (Fr. Bampton) – pdf, text, kindle format
Confessions of a Convert (Mons. R. H. Benson) – pdf, text, kindle format; or audiobook here
Orthodoxy (G. K. Chesterton) – pdf, text, audiobook
Heretics (G. K. Chesterton) – pdf, text, audio
The Shepherd of Hermas – audiobook
Windswept House (Malachi Martin) – pdf, text, kindle format
On Shows (Tertullian) – audiobook
Mysticism (E. Underhill) – pdf, text, audiobook
Spiritual Conferences (Fr. F. G. Faber) – pdf, text, kindle format
The Sermons and Conferences of John Tauler – pdf, text, kindle format
Ecclesiastical Dictionary (Fr. J. Thein) – pdf, text, kindle format
The Catholic Girl’s Guide (Fr. F.X. Lasance) – pdf
Guide for Catholic Young Women (Fr. G. Deshon) – pdf, text, kindle format
Essay on Love (Fr. E. R. Hull) – pdf, text, kindle format

Short Articles and Texts
Liberalism Is a Sin (Don Felix Sarda y Salvany) – read online; or audiobook here
To Start You Thinking (Fr. Herbert H. J. Crees) – pdf  (apologetic booklet addressed to potential Catholic converts)

Catholic Bible, Catechism, Doctrine 
The Knox Bible – read online (trilingual: english Knox translation/greek Septuagint/latin Vulgata)
Catechism of St. Pius X – read online; or download text [rtf] here
The Baltimore Catechism (1891) – pdf; or audio version here
The Catechism Explained (Fr. F. Spirago) – pdf, text, kindle format
Catechism Made Easy: A Familiar Explanation of the Catechism of Christian Doctrine (Fr. Henry Gibson) – pdf, text, kindle format: volume Ivolume IIvolume III
Summa Theologica (St. Thomas Aquinas) – text, kindle format; or read online here or here; or in audio format;  [parallel latin/english text available here]
Sources of Catholic Dogma (Fr. H. J. D. Denzinger) – read online; [latin text here]; or pdf, kindle format here
Dogmatic Canons and Decrees – pdf, text, kindle format
The Canons and Decrees of the Council of Trent – pdf, text, kindle format; or read onlinehere
A Handbook of Moral Theology (Anton Koch) – pdf, text, kindle format: volume Ivolume IIvolume III
The Roman Martyrology (1916) – pdf, text version; or read online here
The Liturgical Year (Dom Prosper Gueranger) – read online; or pdfs here
Cornelius a Lapide: The Great Commentary [on Scripture]- vol. 1vol. 2vol. 3vol. 4vol. 5,vol. 6vol. 7vol. 8
Catena Aurea (St. Thomas Aquinas) – read online (commentaries on the Gospels)

Traditional Liturgy
The Holy Mass (Fr. Michael Mueller) – pdf, text, kindle format; or audiobook here
The Liturgical Year (Dom Prosper Gueranger) – read online; or pdfs here or here
Liber Usualis – 1961 (pdf) here; 1903 (pdf, text, kindle format) here
A Manual of Gregorian Chant (Solesmes) – pdf, text, kindle format
Rituale Romanum (1853; latin) – pdf;  [an english translation of the 1962 version is here]

Understanding Latin

Traditional Prayer Books
My Prayer Book (Fr. F. X. Lasance) – pdf; or read online here
The Baltimore Prayer Book – pdf, text, kindle format
The Blessed Sacrament Book (Fr. F. X. Lasance) – pdf, text, kindle format
Prayer Book for Religious (Fr. F. X. Lasance) – pdf, text, kindle format
Ancient Devotions to the Sacred Heart of Jesus (by 14-17 cent. Carthusian monks) – pdf
Saints’Prayers – pdf; or read online here
Saints’ Prayers (compilation) – pdf; (another prayerbook available here)

Papal Encyclicals and Related Texts
Papal Encyclicals Online (www.papalencyclicals.net) features encyclicals of 43 Popes (from 13th century to present) in html text as well as kindle format. The Vatican website also listsencyclicals and other papal documents.

Some of the noteworthy encyclicals –
Bl. Piux IX – The Syllabus of Errors (1864)
Bl. Pius IX – Quanta Cura (1864, Condemning Current Errors)
Bl. Pius IX – Qui Pluribus (1846, On Faith and Religion)
St. Pius X – Pascendi Dominici Gregis (1907, On the Doctrine of the Modernists)
St. Pius X – Lamentabili Sane (1907, Condemning Errors of Modernism)
St. Pius X – Vehementer Nos (1906, Condemning Separation of Church and State)
St. Pius V – Quo Primum (1570, Promulgating the Tridentine Liturgy)
Pius XI – Quas Primas (1925, on the Kingship of Christ)
Gregory XVI – Mirari Vos (1832, On Liberalism and Religious Indifferentism)
Gregory XVI – Commissum Divinitus (1835, on Church and State)
Leo XIII – Quod Apostolici Muneris (1878, On Socialism)
Leo XIII – Arcanum (1880, On Christian Marriage)
Leo XIII – Diuturnum (1881, On the Origin of Civil Power)
Leo XIII – Inscrutabili Dei Consilio (1878, On the Evils of Society)
Leo XIII – Libertas Praestantissimum (1888, On the Nature of Human Liberty)
Leo XIII – Sapientiae Christianae (1890, On Christians as Citizens)
Leo XIII – Tametsi Futura Prospicientibus (1900, On Jesus Christ the Redeemer)
Leo XIII – Humanum GenusCustodi di Quella Fede and Inimica Vis (1884, 1892, On Freemasonry)
Benedict XVI – Summorum Pontificum (2007, Motu Propio on Tridentine Mass)
Countless other classics on Church history, doctrine, lives and thoughts of saints and Church Fathers (including all the volumes of “Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers” and “Ante-Nicene Fathers”) can be downloaded at ccel.org. (The site unfortunately carries many Protestant books as well, so do your research to make sure any book you intend to read is Catholic and doctrinally sound.)
For a vast quantity of texts, mostly in Latin, see DocumentaCatholicaOmnia.eu.
If you know the name of the book, author or topic, archive.org/details/texts andopenlibrary.org are also helpful.

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